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On a dark green background, the top of a tree with autumnal orange leaves peeks up from the bottom. The words “Playwrights Canada Press Fall 2024” appears in bold yellow text.

Coming in fall 2024

By Brandon Crone Date: July 05, 2024 Tags: News

Are you ready to fall for theatre this autumn? Our new catalogue is brimming with fascinating stories, from whirlwind romances to nail-biting dramas. Make room on your bookshelves and explore our Fall 2024 Catalogue here. Happy reading!

First Métis Man of Odesa
By Matthew MacKenzie and Mariya Khomutova
Matt and Masha hit it off during a theatre research trip in Ukraine. Despite the improbabilities of a cross-continental relationship, a few fairy-tale visits overseas solidifies their bond. But when it seems distance could be the only obstacle to their budding romance, a global pandemic, a surprise pregnancy, and a war in Ukraine put their commitment to the ultimate test. A war romance for our times, First Métis Man of Odesa will sweep you off your feet and make you hopeful for a better future.

Women of the Fur Trade, Second Edition
By Frances Koncan
Sometime in the 1800s, three very different women (with twenty-first century affinities) sit in a fort sharing their views on life, love, and the hot nerd Louis Riel. Updated after its sold-out run at the Stratford Festival and with a brand-new study guide, this historical comedy shifts perspectives from the male gaze to women’s power in the past and present through the lens of the Canadian Fur Trade.

Power Moves: Dance, Culture, Politics
Edited by Seika Boye and MJ Thompson
This collection of essays focuses on how dance and movement engage and enact political questions around agency, mobility, pedagogy, and resistance. Committed to crossing disciplinary boundaries, Power Moves looks to movement knowledge for its radical insights and critical forms of public intervention and pedagogy.

Peace Country
By Pedro Chamale
A new political party in BC has swept into office, promising big changes to curb the climate crisis, which could mean the end for a northern carbon-economy town. When an elected representative who grew up in the town comes to visit, urban idealism clashes with the hard-hitting realities faced by her family and childhood friends. Peace Country is a poignant plea for dialogue in a time marked by profound division.

Niizh
By Joelle Peters
It’s summertime on the rez and Lenna, the youngest of the Little family, prepares to leave for college, with little enthusiasm or help from her stubborn father and reckless brother. As she navigates the crossroads of youth and adulthood, a charming encounter with Sam Thomas, returning to the reserve after years away, sparks a potential romance. Niizh is a heartwarming Indigenous rom-com filled with small-town humour and dream-world interludes, capturing the bittersweet moments of rural upbringing and the journey into love and independence.

Happy Anniversary
By Vanessa Cardoso Whelan
It’s Carlos and Marta’s twelfth wedding anniversary. But as their love story unfolds through a mosaic of memories, we see a blissful courtship descend into a perilous pas de deux of possession, control, and resentment orchestrated by Carlos. Happy Anniversary is an unflinching portrayal of domestic abuse, shedding light on the silent battles waged at home.

我的名是张欣恩 (Gimme chance leh)
By Kris Vanessa Teo Xin-En (张欣恩)
Kris, a young diasporic Chinese woman, attempts to reconcile her upbringing between Canada and Singapore. In doing so, she comes face to face with herself as she pulls apart the tactics she uses in an attempt to fit into two wildly different cultures. Weaving in and out of English, Mandarin, and Singlish, Kris uses storytelling to navigate beauty standards, body image, family, food, and an unexpected friendship with a Chicken Rice Uncle. Deftly unravelling stereotypes and addressing the universal through Kris’s determined persistence and heartwarming sense of humour, 我的名是欣恩 (Gimme chance leh) is about celebrating difference and existing in the in-between.

This Is the Story of the Child Ruled by Fear
By David Gagnon Walker
David has written a play for himself and a gathering of friends and strangers to read together out loud. It tells the story of the rise and fall of an imaginary civilization in an imaginary land. It’s okay if you feel nervous. David is nervous too. With so much to be fearful of these days, it’s best to brave this thing together. An ingenious exercise in interactive storytelling, This Is the Story of the Child Ruled by Fear is a poetic and participatory fable about how to live with the slowly unfolding emergencies of our time.

The Party & The Candidate
By Kat Sandler
In these two entwined, fast-paced plays, the hilarious goings-on behind the scenes of a controversial election chaotically unfold first at the fundraiser that will decide the party’s nominee and then months later at a debate the night before the election. With a large cast of frenzied characters and piercing dialogue, The Party & The Candidate will make sure you never look at politics the same way again.

Eraser
By Bilal Baig, Sadie Epstein-Fine
With Christol Bryan, Marina Gomes, Yousef Kadoura, Tijiki Morris, Anthony Perpuse, and Nathan Redburn
An immersive experience, Eraser delves into the memories and fantasies of a classroom of students as they figure out who they want to be. Six students guide readers through their different journeys, taking them along to the cafeteria, change rooms, and playground, to the places where they feel safest and the most brave, vulnerable, and afraid.

Black Boys
By Stephen Jackman-Torkoff, Tawiah M’Carthy, Thomas Antony Olajide
With Virgilia Griffith, and Jonathan Seinen
Black Boys uncovers the complex dynamics of the queer Black experience. Text, movement, and design portray the rhythm and vulnerability of three very different Black individuals who seek a deeper understanding of themselves, each other, and of how they encounter the world. As they explore their unique identities, their performances rigorously interrogate and playfully subvert the ways in which gender, sexuality, and race are read and performed.

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