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  1. Yvette Nolan

    Yvette Nolan

    Yvette Nolan is a playwright, dramaturg, and director. Her plays include BLADE, Job’s Wife, Video, Annie Mae’s Movement, Scattering Jake, Donne In, and What Befalls the Earth. She is the editor of Beyond the Pale and co-editor, with Donna-Michelle St. Bernard, of Refractions: Solo. She has been the writer-in-residence at Brandon University, Mount Royal College, and the Saskatoon Public Library, as well as playwright-in-residence at the National Arts Centre. She is a past president of Playwrights Union of Canada and of Playwrights Canada Press. Yvette was born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan to an Algonquin mother and an Irish immigrant father and was raised in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She has lived in various parts of Canada, including in the Yukon and Nova Scotia, before moving to Toronto to take helm at Native Earth Performing Arts where she served from until 2011.

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  2. Wajdi Mouawad

    Wajdi Mouawad

    Wajdi Mouawad was born in Lebanon in 1968. Mouawad fled the war-torn country with his family; they lived in Paris for a few years, then settled in Montreal. In 1991, shortly after graduating from the National Theatre School, he embarked on a career as an actor, writer, director, and producer. In all his work, from his own plays—a dozen so far, including Journée de noces chez les Cromagnons (Wedding Day at the Cro-Magnons’), Littoral (Tideline), and Incendies (Scorched- which served as the basis for the Academy Award nominated film Incendies)—Wajdi Mouawad is guided by the central notion that “all art bears witness to human existence through the prism of beauty.” From 2000–2004 he was the artistic director of Montreal’s Théâtre de Quat’Sous; in 2005 he founded two companies specializing in the development of new work: Abé carré cé carré in Canada (with Emmanuel Schwartz), and Au carré de l’hypoténuse in France. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honours for his writing and directing, including the 2000 Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama (Littoral), the 2002 Chevalier de l’Ordre National des Arts et des Lettres (France) and the 2004 Prix de la Francophonie. He is currently Artistic Director of the National Arts Centre French Theatre. Learn More
  3. Stephen Massicotte

    Stephen Massicotte

    Stephen Massicotte was born in Trenton, Ontario, and spent his earliest years living on various Canadian Forces bases in Canada and Europe. For the most part, he grew up in Thunder Bay, where he developed his interests in reading, film, and art. He studied graphic design at Cambrian College, and later, theatre at the University of Calgary. After graduating with a BFA in Drama, he stayed in Calgary to work as an actor, helping to found Ground Zero Theatre and The Shakespeare Company. With the Fringe Festival circuit success of his play, The Boy’s Own Jedi Handbook, Stephen began to focus on playwriting. In 2002, Mary’s Wedding premiered at Alberta Theatre Projects and has gone on to have more than a hundred productions in Canada, the US, New Zealand, and the UK. In the years following, Stephen has continued to write for the theatre, as well as opera, film, and fiction. His play The Oxford Roof Climber’s Rebellion is the winner of the Gwen Pharis Ringwood Award for Drama at the Alberta Literary Awards and the Carol Bolt Award for Drama. The Clockmaker won a Betty Mitchell Award for Outstanding New Play and the inaugural Toronto Theatre Critics’ Association Award for Best Canadian Play. He currently lives in New York City.

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  4. Rosa Laborde

    Rosa Laborde

    Rosa Laborde is a playwright and actress. Previous plays include The Source, produced as part of the Rhubarb! Festival at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, and the Toronto Fringe hit Sugar, voted Outstanding New Play by NOW Magazine. She currently resides in Toronto. Learn More
  5. Robert Morgan

    Robert Morgan

    Robert Morgan has written more than twenty professionally produced plays, many of which have toured nationally and internationally and he has acted in and directed more than forty productions. He has won the prestigious Chalmers Award for outstanding play six times and four of his plays have won the Dora Mavor Moore Award for best production. His work has received a total of ten Dora nominations and has been performed around the world.

    In 2001, Robert was the founding artistic director of the Children’s Peace Theatre. In its first two seasons, the Peace Theatre involved more than one hundred children and young people in an active program of training, workshops, and performances. In his role as artistic director, Robert delivered two official presentations to the United Nations in New York at the 2002 Special Session on the Children of the World. Prior to his work with the Peace Theatre, Robert formed Roseneath Productions in 1986 with David S. Craig in order to produce and tour his solo show Morgan’s Journey. The play, which has become the longest running touring play in Canadian history, has been called a children’s classic and the company, which incorporated as Roseneath Theatre in 1993 has established an international reputation for producing plays of the highest quality for audiences of all ages. He lives in Toronto with his wife, Susan Lee Marcus, and their two children Diana and Clare. Learn More
  6. Robert Majzels

    Robert Majzels

    Robert Majzels is a novelist, playwright, and translator. He is the author of three novels: Hellman’s Scrapbook (Cormorant, 1992); City of Forgetting (Mercury Press, 1998), which was shortlisted for the QSPELL Fiction Award in Montreal; and Apikoros Sleuth (Mercury Press, 2004). He has translated several books from the French, fiction by Anne Dandurand, poetry with Erin Mouré by Nicole Brossard, and novels by France Daigle, including Just Fine (House of Anansi, 2000) for which he won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Translation. Learn More
  7. Paul Ledoux

    Paul Ledoux

    Paul Ledoux was born and raised in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He studied at Dalhousie University and the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. He began writing for theatre while living in Montreal and working at the Centaur Theatre.

    His play The Electrical Man won the award for best play in the 1976 Quebec Drama Festival. Since then, he has worked as an artistic director, dramaturge, director, designer, and now writes for film and television as well as theatre. He won the Chalmers Award for Fire (written with David Young, premiered at Magnus Theatre, 1986) and was nominated for a second for Secret Garden (adapted from Frances Hodgson Burnett, Young People’s Theatre, 1991). He has twice been a finalist for the Dora Mavor Moore Award for Fire and Judy! (Stages Cabaret, 1980). Other plays include: The Children of the Night (Factory Theatre, 1982), As Time Goes By (music by David Smyth and Peter Willson, Magnus, 1986), Sam Slick, The Clockmaker (music by A. MacDonald, Mermaid Theatre, 1983), Love is Strange (with David Young, Magnus, 1984), Cheatin' Hearts (with David Smyth, Magnus, 1994), Ubu the Barbarian (songs by Joe Hall, Arbour Festival), and Anne (Young People’s Theatre, 1998). Learn More
  8. Nicole Moeller

    Nicole Moeller

    Nicole Moeller is an Edmonton-based playwright and a graduate of Grant MacEwan University’s Journalism and Theatre Arts programs. She was the first-place winner in the Alberta Playwrights’ Network 24-hour playwriting competitions in 2008 and 2009, and has received various awards for her work. Nicole was a member of Citadel Theatre’s playwrights’ forum from 2011–2013. Learn More
  9. Monique Mojica

    Monique Mojica

    Monique Mojica is a Kuna and Rappahannock actor and playwright based in Toronto. She began training at the age of three and belongs to the second generation spun directly from the web of New York’s Spiderwoman Theater. She is a longtime collaborator with Floyd Favel on various research and performance projects investigating Native performance culture. Her published plays include Princess Pocahontas and the Blue Spots and Birdwoman and the Suffragettes. She is an acclaimed stage and film actor, nominated for best supporting actress by Native Americans in the Arts for her role in Smoke Signals. Monique is former Artistic Director of Native Earth Performing Arts, and the editor of a special issue of Canadian Theatre Review on Native theatre. Monique was seen as Caesar in Death of a Chief, Native Earth’s adaptation of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. She is currently creating Chocolate Woman Dreams the Milky Way. She continues to explore theatre as healing, as an act of reclaiming historical/cultural memory and as an act of resistance. Learn More
  10. Mitch Miyagawa

    Mitch Miyagawa

    Mitch Miyagawa grew up in Edmonton, and was lured north by his wife and co-producer, Angela Walkley, in 1998. They live in Whitehorse with their two latest productions, Tomio and Sam. Mitch has worked as a director, screenwriter, producer, and story editor. In addition to his work with Up and Away as creative producer, Mitch is currently working on his first movie-of-the-week, The Asahi Baseball Story, with Force Four Films, funded by Movie Central and Telefilm. He has also written professionally for the stage and for magazines. Notably, his play The Plum Tree was widely produced in Canadian theatres. He was nominated for a Western Magazine Award in non-fiction for his feature story “Elvis: The Yukon Years,” in Geist magazine. Learn More

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